Come See Us At Hub On Wheels

Several MassBike staff members will be at a booth at this weekends Hub on Wheels, come by and say hi! Also we will be supporting the Boloco Block party Pong Toss.



The block party will feature Boloco Pong Toss, a fund-raising game used to support local non-profits. This Sunday, the game will cost $2 to play and prizes will include food from the boloco tents, special limited-edition boloco cowbells, and boloco water bottles. 100% of the proceeds generated from Boloco Pong Toss will go into a pool to be divided amongst a handful of deserving bike-friendly causes. The bike organizations that receive the most support will receive the highest percentage of the proceeds, so come on out, play a little pong toss, and support MassBike!




Thats right, you can support MassBike, and win prizes all at the same time!

I Am A Professional Photographer, And I Ride

Here's a great story from our And I Ride campaign! We are seeking to put a face on cycling in support of a legislative campaign that we are working on this year. You can read the rest of these great bicyclist bios here.

We are still accepting entries, so be sure to read below to find out how to send in your story.

Our next story comes from Josh.


Where I Ride: I commute from Arlington to South Boston and back most days. I also Mtn Bike at the Fellsway, Harlod Parker State Forest, Vietnam, Lynn, Woods, and various places throughout New England.
How Often I Ride: Several times a week, multiple times a day.

My Story:
I am a husband and a stepfather that lives in Arlington, MA. I have a basement full of bicycles for our our family. I generally ride a single speed road bike back and forth to the photography studio in South Boston's Fort Point neighborhood. I dig the bike paths and bike lanes that help make the experience safer for me. I ride a full suspension mountain bike as much as I can. After work rides are usually at the Middlesex Fellsway and weekend rides somewhere else. I also appreciate the access to the trails on both public and private land throughout our state.


Thanks Josh!

We still want to hear your story. Tell us about yourself and how bicycling is a part of your life. Just copy and paste the form below into an email, fill it in, and send it to shane@massbike.org.

  • Name:

  • Email:

  • Where You Ride:

  • How Often You Ride:

  • Your Profession/Relation/Title (lawyer, nurse, Grandma, son, etc):

  • A picture of you on your bicycle, or you in your daily life (be sure we can see your face):

  • A paragraph or two about your life and your bicycle:


I Am A Medical Research Assistant, And I Ride

Here's another great story from our And I Ride campaign! We are seeking to put a face on cycling in support of a legislative campaign that we are working on this year. You can read the rest of these great bicyclist bios here.

We are still accepting entries, so be sure to read below to find out how to send in your story.

Our next story comes from Evan.


Where I Ride: Cambridge, Somerville, Brookline, Longwood/Mission Hill,South End, Jamaica Plain, Allston
How Often I Ride: I ride every day, rain/shine/snowfest/100 degrees/1 degree/whatever.

My Story:
I spent a couple years in Boston taking the T and walking everywhere, and
thought that was fine. Sometimes it was really cold, or really hot, or
really crowded, or i had to wait a long time but it got me there. Then i
brought my old bike up from my parents' house and started cycling once and a
while instead. I'd ridden a bunch when i was younger- mostly mountain biking
and BMX (and i was bad at both), and urban cycling was completely new to me.
It was nerve-wracking. But it didn't take me long to get used to it, and it
was only a few more months before i canceled my monthly T pass and never
looked back. I got hooked on the freedom of movement, the exercise, the fun
and camaraderie, and by experiencing the city in a completely new way.

My bikes have become a huge and very natural part of my life. I ride to
work, to rugby practice, to play softball, to band practice, to the store,
to restaurants and bars. I go on random rides just for fun. Just about
everything i do involves riding my bike. People think i'm nuts for turning
down a ride because i'd rather bike it, but they think twice when i beat
them to wherever we're going. I can't imagine life without riding my bike!


Thanks Evan!

We still want to hear your story. Tell us about yourself and how bicycling is a part of your life. Just copy and paste the form below into an email, fill it in, and send it to shane@massbike.org.

  • Name:

  • Email:

  • Where You Ride:

  • How Often You Ride:

  • Your Profession/Relation/Title (lawyer, nurse, Grandma, son, etc):

  • A picture of you on your bicycle, or you in your daily life (be sure we can see your face):

  • A paragraph or two about your life and your bicycle:


I Am A Manager, And I Ride

Here's another great story from our And I Ride campaign! We are seeking to put a face on cycling in support of a legislative campaign that we are working on this year. You can read the rest of these great bicyclist bios here.

We are still accepting entries, so be sure to read below to find out how to send in your story.

Our next story comes from Doug.



Where I Ride: Mansfield to Natick, Sharon, Attleboro, Walpole, Canton, Milton, Sherborn, Dover, Foxboro, Wrentham, Easton, Plainville, Rhode Island

How Often I Ride: 3 to 7 days a week.

My Story:

I am a husband and father, and have been a foster father for 3 children. I’ve also have been riding bikes for nearly 40 years. Cycling is part of who I am, like Lance Armstrong's book, It’s not about the bike. Cycling has been the catalyst for many wonderful experiences that I have been fortunate enough to have. Sometimes it's the little things, like a helpful push from a fellow competitor while struggling up a steep hill in a bike race, just enough of a push to get over the top. Or catching a glimpse of a Fisher Cat sneaking across the road on a quiet morning in the back roads in Norfolk. Other times it is the opportunity to help others, once I came upon a woman with at least 3 whining kids in her broken down car on an empty country road, (long before the advent of cell phones). Being a mechanic, I made a small repair to her car and sent her on her way.

The sheer efficiency of cycling to work is a kick; I am really doing several things at once, staying fit, reducing my carbon footprint, reducing traffic, and saving my gas money. Just to name a few. I have to temper my religious like advocacy for cycling because for so many it just does not click, and the only reason that I can come up with is that non-cyclist's perspective is a bit different from mine. This must be true because I don't know how many times I have witnessed others doing things with apparently equal enthusiasm that I can see that might be enjoyable but cannot imagine doing, (scratching lottery tickets, ice fishing, riding loud motorcycles...).

For the past 6 years or so I have ridden almost 10,000 miles each year, mostly commuting to work. I have commuted to work by bike for over 14 years, my only disappointment is not being able to recruit others to do the same, I’d really like to see and ride with more people riding their bikes to work. What I have done is get noticed and built a reputation. On more than one occasion, a coworker has told me that I am their hero as I leave to ride home, on another occasion, a stranger stopped me in a store (I was in street clothes, not my cycling gear) and asked if I was the cyclist they see every AM in all kinds of weather on their way to work. The stranger told me that he thought it was very cool that I got out there and rode to work in all weather. While the attention is nice, it means that riding a bike to work is still seen as unusual. Changing minds and behavior can be difficult. Cycling is an adventure, and I have a thousand stories about my experiences, experiences that I would have missed had I been sitting in a car.



Thanks Doug!

We want to hear your story. Tell us about yourself and how bicycling is a part of your life. Just copy and paste the form below into an email, fill it in, and send it to shane@massbike.org.

  • Name:

  • Email:

  • Where You Ride:

  • How Often You Ride:

  • Your Profession/Relation/Title (lawyer, nurse, Grandma, son, etc):

  • A picture of you on your bicycle, or you in your daily life (be sure we can see your face):

  • A paragraph or two about your life and your bicycle:


Last Chance To Submit Films To Boston Film Festival!

We received this message from the director of the Boston Bike Film Festival, act now to get your film shown! Act now as the deadline is this weekend (Sept. 19th).



Last chance to submit your film to the 6th annual Boston Bike Film Festival is this weekend. This festival, held each October at the Brattle Theatre, is a fundraiser for area cycling advocacy groups such as Mass Bike and Bikes Not Bombs. We count on local, regional and national filmmakers who have an opportunity to effect change in the cycling community, so this is your chance to be heard. Or you can just submit a fun film! So Come Pedal Your Film, and join us October 22-23 in Harvard Square!

Cat Bryant
director, Boston bike film festival
October 22-23, 2010
come pedal your film!
www.bostonbikefilmfest.org

Construction Alert: Longfellow Bridge, Boston

We don't usually issue alerts for local road construction, but this one will affect thousands of bicyclists daily for a few days/weeks.

Bicyclists riding across the bridge from Cambridge to Boston are affected by construction near the Boston approach to Charles Circle. The bike lane and one travel lane are temporarily blocked to allow construction of a long-needed sidewalk to allow safe pedestrian and wheelchair access where none exists today. The bike lane will be back as soon as construction is completed (a matter of a couple of weeks if the just-completed work on the other side of the bridge is any indication.) But for now, bicyclists need to merge with car traffic as they approach the Boston end. Please be patient and don't try to squeeze through to the intersection - there really isn't enough room. Signage is in place to remind drivers that bicycles may use the full lane.

While this is inconvenient, it is necessary to get the sidewalk built, and it is an improvement over the way the sidewalk construction on the other side of the bridge was handled. MassDOT made sure that signage was in place this time right from the start to put motorists on notice that bicyclists would be using the full lane.

On the other side of the bridge, the construction reduced the lanes getting on the bridge to one, with no signage to warn drivers and bikers that everyone had to merge into a single lane briefly. This caused confusion and at least a few close calls (including one I experienced personally). We contacted MassDOT about the lack of warning signs, and were told that MassDOT had specified signs but the contractor failed to install them. At this point, the new sidewalk on the other side is done (see below), and the lane restriction is gone.

This is part of the first phase of the much more extensive project that will happen later to completely reconstruct the bridge. After seeing the challenges to safe bike access during construction that even this small part of the project caused, we will be working closely with MassDOT to ensure that they have a complete and workable plan to maintain safe bike access when the real construction starts.

Join Team MassBike At Hub On Wheels!

Join Team MassBike at Hub On Wheels on Sunday, September 26, 2010. Support Hub On Wheels and raise money for MassBike at the same time!



Ride 10, 30, or 50 miles. Experience a car-free Storrow Drive, explore hidden pathways and historic neighborhoods, and take in views of the Boston Harbor that you've never seen before.

Cost: $45 Hub On Wheels registration and a suggested $50 fundraising commitment for MassBike.

Click here for one-stop registration for Hub On Wheels and Team MassBike. (Register with us and we'll handle your HOW registration for you!)

Already registered for HOW? No problem, you can still click here to join Team MassBike! All we ask is that you raise at least $50 to support our advocacy and education programs.

Questions call Shane Jordan at 617-542-2453 or email events@massbike.org.

Action Alert: One Last Congressman Needs To Hear From You!



Back in March 2010, we invited Massachusetts bicyclists to join us for a Virtual Lobby Day in support of an exciting piece of legislation to fund bicycling and walking infrastructure improvements, H.R. 4722, the Active Community Transportation Act. Massachusetts Rep. Michael Capuano was one of the original sponsors of the bill, but we wanted support from the rest of our delegation. Your emails and phone calls had an immediate effect, with Rep. Edward Markey and Rep. James McGovern immediately signing on as co-sponsors. With your help, we kept up the pressure, and Reps. William Delahunt, Barney Frank, Steven Lynch, John Tierney, and Niki Tsongas all signed up as co-sponsors, making Massachusetts a national leader on this issue (see how we stack up here).

Now, eight out of ten of our Congressional Representatives support the ACT Act. Only Representatives Neal and Olver are not co-sponsoring the bill. Chairman Olver leads the Appropriations Committee, so he cannot sponsor this funding bill, but Representative Neal can, and we need your help again to convince him. If you live in Hampden, Hampshire, Norfolk or Worcester counties, click here and enter your address to check if Rep. Neal is your Congressman.

If Rep. Neal is your Congressman, please call his office at 202-225-5601 and ask him to co-sponsor the Active Community Transportation Act (H.R. 4722) introduced by Congressman Earl Blumenauer of Oregon.

When you call, you can use these talking points:


  • Bicycling and walking are part of the solution. Half of all trips in the United States are three miles or less, yet the majority of these short trips are made by car. Shifting more of these short trips to biking and walking would not only reduce congestion, air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and our dependence on oil, but will also improve physical activity, safety, and livability.


  • Investing in bicycling and walking infrastructure works. Commuting by bicycle has increased 43 percent since 2000 – and by 69 percent in designated Bicycle Friendly Communities that have invested in infrastructure improvements.


  • MA is a leading supporter of this bill, with eight of our ten Representatives already co-sponsors.




MassBike is partnering nationally with Rails-to-Trails Conservancy's Campaign for Active Transportation to make sure federal funding for bicycling and walking infrastructure is a major part of the next transportation bill.

Get Geared Up To Find The Cure For Cystic Fibrosis!

Who: The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Massachusetts/Rhode Island Chapter proudly announces the Eurand CF Cycle for Life (formerly the Cycle for Haylee) bike tour to raise funds for cystic fibrosis research, medical programs and patient care. The Cycle for Haylee (CFH) has a 12 year history of dedicated riders and sponsors raising more than $550,000 in the quest for the CF cure and control. In 2010 CFH expanded into a national bike tour with 17 rides taking place across the country.

What: The Eurand CF Cycle for Life is a 12, 30 and 65 bike tour fundraising event that will take place Saturday, October 2, 2010. The event is a one day, fully supported bike tour through the metro west area including the towns of Ashland, Concord, Dover, Framingham, Holliston, Marlborough, Maynard, Medfield, Medway, Natick, Sherborn, and Sudbury on picturesque 12, 30 and 65 mile routes. Riders will receive a delicious BBQ provided by Tennessee’s BBQ, a t-shirt, entertainment and much more.

In Massachusetts our 2010 goal is to host 250 cyclists and raise $150,000. Together, we can make this happen!

Each rider will contact donors in the process of fundraising and be eligible for wonderful prizes. When this is combined with the grass-roots initiative, and the engagement of volunteers and sponsors, more than 1,000 people will receive information and communication about The Eurand CF Cycle for Life Bike Tour.

The Eurand CF Cycle for Life Bike Tour offers an opportunity for corporations, individuals and local business to strengthen their involvement in the community and gain positive exposure. Outlined below are some general rider demographics.

Where: Start and finish line, Fatima Shrine, 101 Summer Street, Holliston

When: Saturday, October 2, 2010
65 mile route riders register at 7:00 am
30 & 12 mile route rider register at 9:00 am

How: Get involved by riding, donating or sponsoring by calling the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at (508) 655-6000 or 1-800-966-0444 and asking for Terry Waite or visit the website at http://mass-ri.cff.org/cycleforlife

Why: Cystic Fibrosis is an incurable genetic disease primarily affecting the respiratory and digestive systems. Not long ago, the life expectancy was 20 years of age. Research supported by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has extended the expectancy to 37 years of age.

The Cystic FibrosisFoundation participates in MassBike’s Charity Ride Partner Program to help support MassBike’s advocacy and education programs.

I Am An Attorney, And I Ride

Here's a great story from our And I Ride campaign! We are seeking to put a face on cycling in support of a legislative campaign that we are working on this year. You can read the rest of these great bicyclist bios here.

We are still accepting entries, so be sure to read below to find out how to send in your story.

Our next story comes from Chris.


Where I Ride: All over the Boston area
How Often I Ride: Daily

My Story:
I ride a bike. I have punk rock tattoos. I am an anarchist. I usually
dress in all black. When people first meet me they often think I am a bike
messenger. I am not. I am an attorney. This often seems to invoke
judgment from both others bikers, and lawyers. Many seem to think that
people who ride bikes (especially in the winter) are too poor to own a car,
have had their license suspended from OUIs, are Lance Armstrong or “hipster”
wannabes, are environmental fanatics, or are otherwise some sort of social
anomaly.


I ride a bike for many reasons, but for none of the ones listed
above. First, and most important, I ride because it is just plain fun. I
don’t think any adult can ride a bike without some flashback to the
childhood enjoyment of a first bicycle. That fun is still available to
everyone in their adult life. One just needs to start pedaling again.
Second, I ride because 90% of the time it is faster than driving, or taking
public transportation. Third, I ride because it is great way to keep
healthy. Forth, I ride because it is far cheaper than gasoline. Fifth, I
ride because I never have to drive around looking for that all-elusive
parking spot. Biking is a faster, a cheaper, and a more enjoyable way to
get around the city, while keeping healthy. What more could you ask for?



Thanks Chris!

We still want to hear your story. Tell us about yourself and how bicycling is a part of your life. Just copy and paste the form below into an email, fill it in, and send it to shane@massbike.org.

  • Name:

  • Email:

  • Where You Ride:

  • How Often You Ride:

  • Your Profession/Relation/Title (lawyer, nurse, Grandma, son, etc):

  • A picture of you on your bicycle, or you in your daily life (be sure we can see your face):

  • A paragraph or two about your life and your bicycle:



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